Sunday, August 21, 2016

"Flooded"

6 x 6"
oil on panel


This was a study I did in the spring and decided to hang on to it - but this seems like the right time to offer it on auction to raise money. 

I will donate 100% of the sale for the Red Cross Louisiana Flood Relief Fund - so join me in an effort to help our friends in need.  To donate directly to the Red Cross Flood Relief Fund, click here.

Please click here to the auction page.  Auction ends August 31, 9 pm ET.

an added note about this painting - it was a study for a themed group show - the subject was man-made remnants getting swallowed up by nature.  I was watching aerial footage of flooding and saw compositions and patterns that I wanted to explore in painting.  I know flooding is a tragic event, but to anyone's eyes, the visuals really bring it home.  This painting was a test to feel out how this would translate.  I ended up passing on the group show - but I do hope the sale of this piece brings an important contribution to the people in need in Louisiana.



Wednesday, August 17, 2016

"Close Encounter"

12 x 12"
oil on panel


For me, discovering the artist, Chuck Close, was a revelation.   I was a teenager, already obsessed with drawing people.  And there I stood, staring at a gigantic canvas of a face, wondering how he did it.  Realizing that his technique was to grid the original photo and essentially blow it up on canvas was a huge learning experience for me.  Naturally, I started to grid every photo, album cover, magazine ad I could find and practice.  He's been a hero of mine ever since.

Close is a man to be admired not just for his extraordinary artistic abilities.   He is the son of artistic parents who supported his creative interests right from the start.  He suffers from dyslexia, struggled with schoolwork, couldn't play sports due to a neuromuscular condition but he did excel in art.  He lost his father at the age of 11, his mother fell ill with cancer and Close suffered health problems that kept him home and in bed for long periods of time.  At the age of 14, he saw an exhibition of Jackson Pollock, which made him want to become an artist.

He studied art during the abstract-crazed art world, chose to go in the completely opposite direction and developed his photorealism style.  Interesting enough, Close suffers from prosopagnosia, or face-blindness, not recognizing faces - which boggles the mind considering his ability to replicate details on faces to a tee.  His technique for applying color helped the development of the inkjet printer - bet you didn't know that.

By the 70's, Close's work was in the finest galleries all over the world and he was thought of as one of America's best contemporary artists.  At the age of 48, he suffered the sudden rupture of a spinal artery and was left almost entirely paralyzed and confined to a wheelchair.  After regaining the partial use of his arms, he pushed on, developing a studio to accommodate his wheelchair and with a brush taped to his wrist, he began painting a combination of abstract and looser pieces that I particularly love - like his self-portrait above, done in 2005.  

He's a man with no excuses.  A man who never played the victim.  He's evolved with age, years and limitations.  He's a man to be admired.

My painting will be included in the October group show 12 x 12", held at Robert Lange Studios.

Please click here for a larger view and purchase/contact information.



Tuesday, August 16, 2016

"Wife Guard"

6 x 6"
oil on panel


I just  L-u-r-v-e  how this painting turned out.

From the beach on Cape Cod, a man keeping watch over his sunbathing wife.

Please click here to the auction page.  Auction ends August 26, 9 pm ET.


Saturday, August 13, 2016

"Cypresses"

6 x 9-1/2"
oil on panel
sold


Most of you know bits and pieces of the life of Vincent van Gogh.  I promise you, if you've never seen a painting of his in person, you're really missing out on the splendor of brush strokes, the thick, rich colors swirling around the canvas, the movement, the passion that van Gogh had of the world around him.  

Van Gogh was 36-years-old when he painted 'Cypresses' - during his year-long stay at the asylum in Saint-Remy and a year before his death.  It is a more close-up view of the the tall and massive trees he found 'beautiful as regards lines and proportions, like an Eyptian obelisk'.  


Friday, August 5, 2016

"Summer Break"

9 x 12"
oil on panel
sold


A couple of days ago, while I was working on this new painting, I stepped outside to stretch and looked up at the summer sky full of big, puffy clouds against the jewel-blue  -  the same summer sky that I was painting in Frank Benson's Summer.

I know Benson's painting so well.  In 33 years of framing, I'm guessing I framed the print 50+ times.  Women, especially, loved it. 

Frank Weston Benson was a Massachusetts native born in 1862 - became the founding member of the Ten American Painters in his 30's, associating himself with famous impressionistic painters like William Merritt Chase, Thomas Dewing, Childe Hassam to name a few.  It was a desire to be a part of like-minded artists and turned out to be a brilliant marketing strategy - their exhibitions were wildly popular around the turn of the century.

Benson painted Summer in 1909, featuring his daughters and niece on the cliffs near his family's vacation home on North Haven Island in Maine.  He composed the women from sketches and photographs, creating the 'personifications of beauty and optimism on a perfect summer day'. 

Benson taught at the School of the Museum of Fine Arts, Boston and occasionally taught at Rhode Island School of Design.  The painting was donated to the school's art museum by one of Benson's major patrons, where it hangs today.

Please click here for a larger view and purchase/contact information.



Thursday, August 4, 2016

"Head and Shoulders"

6 x 8"
oil on panel
sold


Since I was a teenager, I've been fascinated with realism - or in this case, hyper-realism.  Just the idea of how an artist executes the artwork boggles my mind.  You see paintings in museums that look like a photograph, so precise it's staggering.  I wanted to do that for years, until I realized I wasn't up to it.  I'm more interested, now, in realism with a looser style - although you'll notice some paintings lean tighter and some, like much of these smaller pieces I frequently auction, are more painterly.  It keeps me sane.

The hyper-realism sculpture I feature in this new painting is by Evan Penny titled 'Old Self: Portrait of the Artist as He Will (Not) Be'.  Not only is this work of art insanely precise, down to every wrinkle and whisker and fold, the cast of shadows under the strong lighting is so very cool - not to mention the reactions of the museum patrons.  Evan Penny has a great website and on the Crystal Bridges Museum's website, you can read 'A Conversation With Evan Penny' that will give you insight of the artist's thoughts.


Saturday, July 30, 2016

"Walk A Mile (in Their Shoes)"

12 x 12"
oil on panel


I started this painting while watching the first day of the Democratic National Convention and finished it while watching the final night of the convention.  I felt like the events and speakers fueled my progress those four days.  

It was timely with respect to my painting - Norman Rockwell's profound painting.  The importance of equality in all Americans.  The pursuit of a nation where everyone deserves opportunities.  Dignity.  Safety.  Rights.  Hope.

Norman Rockwell's 1964 painting 'The Problem We All Live With' depicts the true event of 6-year-old Ruby Bridges being escorted to an all-white public school in New Orleans, by four U.S. Marshals during the contentious fight over school segregation in 1960.  Despite the angry crowd jeering as Ruby walked to her first day of school, as told later by one of the U.S. Deputy Marshals, 'She showed a lot of courage. She never cried. She didn't whimper. She just marched along like a little soldier, and we're all very very proud of her.'

My painting will be included in the upcoming group show 12 x 12 - opening October 7th at Robert Lange Studios in Charleston.

Please click here for a larger view and purchase/contact information.

I need to note - the painting can be purchased before the show but needs to remain in the gallery during the exhibition.


Monday, July 25, 2016

That's Progress


I've started on a larger painting for an upcoming show that features Rockwell's 'The Problem We All Live With'.   If you're interested, I'll be posting my progress on my blog Karin Jurick Paints

~ Happy Monday

Sunday, July 24, 2016

"Bear In Mind" (study)

6 x 6"
oil on panel
sold


One of the star attractions in Crystal Bridges Museum of American Art is Arthur Fitzwilliam Tait's 1856 painting 'A Tight Fix - Bear Hunting, Early Winter'.  The scene brings to mind the movie The Revenant - a true story of frontiersman Hugh Glass, who's mauled by a grizzly and abandoned by his group of fur trappers.  Interesting is, although there's no direct evidence this scene is based on Hugh Glass, it is strikingly similar to scenes in the movie.  The Museum of Native American History, not far from Crystal Bridges in Bentonville, Arkansas has one of the only rifles known to belong to Jim Bridger, one of the fur trappers in Hugh Glass's hunting group.

The summary of Tait's painting, in the museum, describes it as 'an icon of American cultural mythology and masculinity'.  When it was first shown, art critics said Tait 'botched the representation of the second hunter, making it unclear whether he's aiming at the bear - neither bear nor man is winning - so a bullet is the only solution to the 'tight fix'.  

More interesting, the summary goes on describing 'critics were particularly sensitive to an impasse between white and black fighters.'   Keep in mind, Tait painted this during the deadlocked war over slavery in the Kansas Territory.  The books of this time were Uncle Tom's Cabin and stories of Davy Crockett where hunting animals and runaway slaves were talked about in similar terms.  

Arthur Tait was born British, and moved to New York City at the age of 31.  He established a hunting camp in the Adirondack Mountains - completely immersed in the frontier life and sport hunting - he produced many paintings and lithographs of related scenes that were wildly popular during his career.




Thursday, July 21, 2016

"Walk A Mile" (study)

6 x 6"
oil on panel
sold


Norman Rockwell's profound 1964 painting 'The Problem We All Live With' is on the top of my Rockwell list.  It depicts 6-year-old Ruby Bridges, an African-American girl, being escorted to an all-white public school in New Orleans, by four deputy U.S. marshalls.  What is so very effective is the viewer is seeing the point of view from the angry crowd, the hint being the racial slurs on the wall and the tomato splattered in between the figures.  

The image was published in a 1964 issue of Look magazine - Rockwell's contract with the Saturday Evening Post ended in 1963 due to Rockwell's continued frustration with the magazine's limitations on his expressions of progressive social interests, including his personal views on civil rights and racial integration.

Norman Rockwell's granddaughter, Abigail, recently wrote a compelling article in the Huffington Post titled Would There Be Norman Rockwell Without The Saturday Evening Post?  Rockwell undoubtedly evolved as an illustrator between 1916 and 1963 - becoming a storyteller with his images like no other.  His career with the Post yielded 322 covers before he ended his contract.

Ruby Bridges, at the age of 56, visited the painting in the White House in 2011 - at the request of President Obama.




The CNN writer, Bob Greene, wrote about that event in this article.  Within that article, these words struck me "..the message of the painting is so powerful that it goes well beyond the incident it portrays. The message transcends our usual Democrats-vs.-Republicans, conservatives-vs.-liberals, left-vs.-right squabbling.  Rockwell was a genius not just because of the technical skill of his artistry, but because of his eye for the telling detail. And in "The Problem We All Live With," the key detail is how he framed the four U.S. marshals who are accompanying that child to school. We do not see their faces; in the painting, the men are cropped at their shoulders.

That is the power and the story of the painting: Four men were accompanying Bridges to school, yes, but the point was, the United States of America was accompanying her. We see the men's "Deputy U.S. Marshal" armbands, and that is what matters. The painting tells us: This country may have its flaws, but when right and wrong are on the line, the nation, in the end, usually chooses to stand for right."




Wednesday, July 20, 2016

"Riveted"

8 x 10"
oil on panel


Norman Rockwell's iconic 'Rosie the Riveter' is a big draw at the Crystal Bridges Museum of American Art.  Rockwell's image made the cover of the Saturday Evening Post on Memorial Day, 1943 - featuring a muscular woman taking her lunch break, a rivet gun on her lap, her lunchbox with Rosie on the lid by her side and, what people love the most, Hitler's manifesto Mein Kampf under her foot.  The U.S. Department of Treasury used the image on war bonds that generated millions for the war effort.

Rockwell's inspiration for Rosie's pose was from Michelangelo's Sistine Chapel ceiling image of the prophet Isaiah.




Norman Rockwell is one of my inspirations for wanting to be an illustrator - and Rosie the Riveter would be many a woman's inspiration for feminism.

Please click here for a larger view and purchase/contact information.



Friday, July 15, 2016

"By The Book"

9 x 12"
oil on panel
sold


From the Crystal Bridges Museum of American Art, a couple admiring Mary Cassatt's 'The Reader' with James McNeill Whistler's 'The Chelsea Girl' to their right.

Interesting facts to mention - Whistler was so happy with his painting 'The Chelsea Girl' he gave it to Mary Cassatt's brother, Alexander, a well-known, important man who was president of the
Pennsylvania Railroad.  The artist, Robert Henri, was their distant cousin - here's my recent painting of Henri's hung in the museum as well.

Please click here for a larger view.


Wednesday, July 13, 2016

Charleston Auction This Saturday

The Annual Small Works Art Auction was Saturday - held at the Sylvan Gallery in Charleston, South Carolina.

I had seven pieces in the auction and there were 250+ total.  All seven paintings of mine sold.



Salty Dog
6 x 8"
sold


Tee Off
6 x 8"
sold


Honing In
5 x 5"
sold


Xemplary
6 x 9"
sold


Patience
8 x 8"
sold


Beach Boys
5 x 5"
sold


Paw Prints
5 x 5"
sold


Thank you for participating and thank you for your bids.



Monday, July 11, 2016

"Coast Guard"

10 x 9"
oil on panel


Hoping this basset hound puts a smile on your face.

From the beach on Hilton Head Island, South Carolina.

Please click here for a larger view and purchase/contact information.



Thursday, July 7, 2016

"Ziegfeld's Girl"

6 x 8"
oil on panel
sold


Jessica Penn, the sultry woman in Robert Henri's painting, was an actress and dancer in the famous Ziegfeld Follies.  I love Robert Henri's work - he introduced a new way of portraiture by painting on a mostly black background where the model's face is the main focus, emerging out of the dark surroundings. 

Robert Henri has an interesting bio - his last name was Cozad, his middle name was Henry.  His father founded the town of Cozaddale, Ohio. In 1882, Mr. Cozad was in a dispute with a rancher over the right to pasture cattle on the Cozad family's land - he ended up shooting and killing the rancher, cleared of wrongdoing, but the town turned against him and his family.  Mr. Cozad fled to Colorado with his family, changed their names to erase the incident and his sons posed as adopted children under the surname Henri.

As a young man, Robert was a student at the famed Pennsylvania Academy of Fine Arts, went back and forth to Paris, taught at the New York School of Art - students were famous painters like Rockwell Kent, Edward Hopper, George Bellows to name a few.  Also to note, Mary Cassatt was his distant cousin.  

Robert Henri led a successful, celebrated life as a painter and died at the age of 64.

From the Crystal Bridges Museum of American Art, a woman admires Robert Henri's portrait of 'Jessica Penn in Black with White Plumes'.




Sunday, July 3, 2016

"Easy Breezy"

8 x 10"
oil on panel
sold


From the Crystal Bridges Museum of American Art, I've featured one of my personal favorites by Andrew Wyeth, titled 'Airborne'.

Taken from the museum's summary, 'The painting depicts Wyeth's home on Benner Island, Maine - painted in a contrasting palette of bright greens and dull greys conveying the site's weather, tides and seasonal rhythms.  The floating feathers add an element of surprise, suggesting that something is taking place just beyond the frame.  Wyeth invites the viewer to speculate what is happening to the ducks and geese who summer on the pond next to his house - perhaps an attack by one of the resident eagles or simply the molting of seagulls?  More likely Wyeth indicated unexpected, sudden violence here - in his world, reality is always mysterious and illusory: like feathers on a breeze, only momentary.'

Please click here for a larger view.


Wednesday, June 29, 2016

"Sunroom"

5 x 7"
oil on panel
sold


A visitor resting in the sunlit passageway in the Crystal Bridges Museum of American Art, Arkansas.




Monday, June 27, 2016

"Lean In"

9 x 12"
oil on panel
sold


I've been hard at work on this new painting that took a good part of a week to complete.  And that, my friends, is why I frequently veer off and paint small, quicker piecess.  It keeps me sane.

My painting depicts a museum visitor leaning in on Pablo Picasso's iconic 'Guernica'.

Please click here for a larger view.


Speaking of icons,  Bill Cunningham, a fixture in New York City, passed away at the age of 87.  If you don't know, Bill was a legendary fashion photographer for the New York Times for over 40 years.




He was easy to spot, on his bicycle, wearing his signature blue jacket and always with a camera - spotting and capturing fashion trends up and down the sidewalks of NYC.  He inspired me to see the great diversity of humans and having the guts to get out there with my camera.

A really charming and interesting documentary to watch is Bill Cunningham New York  (available on Netflix) - you'll love it.



Wednesday, June 22, 2016

"Enlightened"

6 x 8"
oil on panel
sold


On my recent trip to the Crystal Bridges Museum of American Art, I spotted this young lady - she really impressed me with her genuine interest in the art.  I suspect she was taking personal notes of the pieces she really liked.

The painting she is studying is 'Landscape' by Robert Seldon Duncanson.  The artist, at 20 years of age, decided he'd rather paint canvases than houses, which he'd been doing up until then.  He was largely self-taught, had a long career as an artist until his death at age 51.

Shortly after the Civil War broke out, Duncanson exiled to Canada,  seeking out a place where racism would not get in the way of his profession as an artist.  There he studied the landscape paintings of Canadian artists, moved to the UK and toured with his artworks - he was well received and the prestigious London Art Journal declared him a master of landscape painting.

Duncanson had an important impact on American art.  His father was Scottish-Canadian, his mother was African-American and it was said Duncanson had infused his paintings with an African-American sensibility although he once wrote 'I have no color on the brain; all I have on the brain is paint.'

Duncanson's 'Landscape' depicts, very small, loggers floating rafts of timber down the Saint Lawrence River near Montreal with the glow of the sunset, a signature subject of the artist's, of a mundane workday activity in a beautiful setting.




Monday, June 20, 2016

Crystal Bridges Museum of American Art



Listen Up




I wanted to start this first week of summer with a highly-recommended trip you must take - to the Crystal Bridges Museum of American Art.  I've wanted to go for a while and just packed a bag and took a long road trip to the small town of Bentonville in Arkansas.  The red star shows you where Bentonville is....




Crystal Bridges Museum of American Art was founded by the Walton Family Foundation - the Walmart Family as we know it.  The philanthropist and arts patron and collector, Alice Walton, is to thank for this amazing museum.




On arrival, I parked my car right in front of this banner - featuring one of my very favorite American painters, Wayne Thiebaud.  I was soooo excited.

The museum is part of a 120-acre park, with nature trails and sculpture gardens throughout.




Did I mention it was free?  And parking is free too.




I am very partial to American Art and this museum takes you in a timeline of our country, from colonial times to contemporary - just outstanding.  A few of my favorites were....


 Alexander Hamilton by Giuseppe Ceracchi


Ward by George Tooker


Provincetown by Richard Estes


Haystacks by Martin Johnson Heade


Ambulance Call by Jacob Lawrence


About the town of Bentonville, Arkansas - 




It is a charming, middle-America, safe and friendly place to visit.  I recommend staying at the 21c Museum Hotel in downtown, a block from the town square and very near Crystal Bridges.  I loved my stay and wanted to spread the good word.

~ Happy Summer




Sunday, June 12, 2016

"A Paper Trail"

5 x 7"
oil on panel
sold


In times of sorrow and grief, I paint.

A young lady enthusiastically sketches on the floor in the Legion of Honor Museum in San Francisco.




Friday, June 10, 2016

"Floored"

6 x 6"
oil on panel
sold


From the Museum of Fine Arts Boston, a young woman sketches on the floor in front of John Singer Sargent's 'The Daughters of Edward Darley Boit'.




Thursday, June 9, 2016

"A Voice"

8 x 12"
oil on panel
sold


This new painting is a more revealing view of the two young men in front of Jean-Michel Basquait's Untitled, (Cadmium) - referring to the study I painted a couple of weeks ago.  The shadows are so very wonderful, I couldn't wait to paint this piece.

A good friend of mine captured this moment, meaning to photograph the painting, when the two young men walked up and it suddenly became, she said, 'a Karin Jurick painting'.  I love that.

Please click here for a larger view.


Sunday, June 5, 2016

"A Tradition"

12 x 9"
oil on panel
sold


My homage to one of my all-time favorite movies Ferris Bueller's Day Off, on its 30th anniversary.  At the time it came out in 1986,  I was still missing my life in Chicago as a teenager just a few years back.  There's a scene in the movie when Ferris, his girlfriend Sloane and his best friend Cameron go through the Art Institute of Chicago - something I'd done dozens of times and even cut school to do so.  The three friends stop and stand in front of the three Picassos - here's a snapshot from the movie....




Well since then, many people have mimicked the pose - it became a tradition.  And their visit to an art museum proved to be an inspiration for young people to do the same.  That's a good thing.

I read a good article this week How Ferris Bueller's Day Off Perfectly Illustrates the Power of Art Museums - and a portion of the article, referring to Cameron's fixation on Seurat's A Sunday on La Grande Jatte,  I really like this quote from the curator at the Smithsonian American Art Museum - "I think that absorption of diving into a picture is as though you have seen yourself looking back at you and you have dived in so deeply you cease to exist," she says about life changing art. "What I tell people when they go through art museums is there will be a moment where you are dumbstruck in front of something and it changes your life forever."

About the Picassos - from left to right is The Red Armchair, Portrait of Sylvette David and Femme Assise, 1949, which was sold on auction.

Please click here for a larger view.



Monday, May 30, 2016

"Go With The Flow II"


Here is the companion to Go With The Flow I  -


Go With The Flow II
5 x 5"
oil on panel
sold